Can SEND children learn to read with phonics?

Moon dogs extra book 1b sit matt 5 900x900

Here at Phonic Books we have been publishing decodable books for beginner and catch-up readers for seventeen years.  During those years we attended many conferences and education shows.  When discussing whether our books were suited to students with Special Educational Needs, we always deferred to the teachers working in SEND settings. While we were confident […]

Read More

Split digraph, Vowel+e, Bossy e, Silent e, magic e – why and how to teach it

The split digraphs a-e, e-e, i-e, o-e, u-e are very common spellings.  They have different names: Silent e, Magic e, Vowel Consonant e, Bossy e, Split digraphs.  Many children struggle to read words with these spelling patterns, so we need to teach them explicitly. Why do we have these spelling patterns in English? The ‘e’ […]

Read More

This summer – an opportunity for catch up reading

Here we are in the last term of school and soon the summer will be upon us. It is really important that during this summer, the ‘summer slump’ of learning loss will not add to the learning loss that has already impacted so many children during the last two years.  A good way to prevent […]

Read More

Homophones – what to do about them?

What are homophones? Homophones are words that sound the same but have different meanings.  The word ‘homophone’ has a Greek origin.  ‘Homo’ meaning ‘same’ and ‘phone’ meaning ‘sound’.  So, the word ‘homophone’ means a same-sounding words that have different meanings.  Some homophones have the same spellings for example, the words ‘row’ as in ‘to row […]

Read More

How to organise your decodable books

Many teachers are now using decodable books to help their beginner readers practice the phonics taught in the classroom lessons.  This is because it is now accepted that decodable texts, which are controlled texts, help children develop decoding, and decoding ability is an essential skill for learning to read. It is important that the books […]

Read More

What’s so great about dictation?

The verb ‘to dictate’ is not one that teachers warm to.  This is because we love to foster creativity in our children and to get them to write their own ideas.  BUT when teaching children how to read and spell we need to use all the best tools we have to instruct our beginner readers […]

Read More

What is reading? – what I should have learned in teacher training

teaching-reading-with-Phonic-Books-catch-up-readers

When I trained to be a teacher in one of the best universities in London, I learned a great deal about the wonderful world of books, how to select quality picture books and spot racially biased books, and even how to make books by stitching them together by hand. We made book covers using potato […]

Read More

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious – scaffolding the teaching of multisyllabic words

Scaffolding the teaching of multisyllabic words –  simple to complex Many teachers are focused on teaching children how to sound out graphemes (spellings) and to blend sounds together into words.  They will even be teaching children how to manipulate phonemes in phonemic awareness activities. These are all essential underlying skills necessary for learning to read.  […]

Read More

What is the point of pointing?

Mother and Daughter reading

Often when I read with a pupil, I need to remind her/him (and myself) to point to the words.  As fluent readers we don’t point to words on the page, but sometimes if we come across a difficult or new word we are trying to work out – we will use our finger to work […]

Read More

What’s in your book bag?

a child's book bag

Beginner readers need a great deal of practice.  Where possible, sending home decodable books is an important opportunity for reading practice.  It is difficult for the teacher or teaching assistant to hear every child read every day or even every week.  So, an adult reading at home with the child has a very significant role […]

Read More